Tag Archives: expensive cigars

Cigar Review – Mombacho Liga Maestro

Another new blend to me, suggested by the folks at Highland Cigar Company.

Mombacho Liga Maestro cigars were originally created in limited

Mombacho Toro

edition to celebrate the boutique cigar company’s 10th Anniversary. These Nicaraguan puros are the product of Mombacho master blender, Claudio Sgrio, and Italian celebrity cigar enthusiast, Stefano Bertini. Now a regular production cigar made at Mombacho’s factory in Granada, Nicaragua, the blend is a medium-full recipe of ligero & viso fillers from Jalapa and Condega, plus a Condega binder, and a lustrous, mouthwatering wrapper from Jalapa.

Honestly, I wasn’t sure what to make of this cigar at first.  The band looked classic in black and gold. A 6X54 toro would do me for a few hours if I smoked slow, which I always do, as you know.

The wrapper was a soft milk chocolate brown and I imagined either heavy spice or smoother, supple flavors when I did my pre-light draw.  Cigar, coffee, slight raisin notes as expected.

Upon lighting up, the cigar’s draw was good, producing a plethora of off gray smoke.  (It was dark in the bar!)

Notes are floral and medium, along with a good dose of cedar.  Over the length of the cigar, mild black pepper joined a classic earthiness.  When I say classic, I mean it’s very distinct, as this cigar was.

The draw remained solid and the burn line even.  Value for your buck?  Solid.

Cigar Review – Ultra Luxury: ACC S. E. 1960 Oak Sherry Barrel

 

1960 Oak Sherry Barrel by ACC Cigars, atop the Don Cervantes Travel humidor

At first glance, this dark cigar looks like it’s going to be a powerhouse.  The band has a very old world Cuban feel to it in design and because it matches well with the darkness of the leaf, it makes it harder to see.

But for a cigar with such a hefty price tag ($2,500 per cigar), I have my suspicions. Yet, the website (Yamantaka Global) says the cigar is the same vintage tobacco as the 1950s Cubans. It’s obvious that this cigar is also rolled entubado like everything else ACC does. What that means is that the cigars are rolled in a tube-like fashion, and require a higher skill level of roller, else the attrition rate of production becomes really high since older tobacco is more susceptible to damage.

I’ve smoked enough ACC cigars to know the quality behind them has always been top notch, but this is hands down, the most expensive cigar on the market, and the most expensive cigar I’ve ever smoked to date.

Cutting the cigar and doing a pre-light draw reveal really smooth flavors that are a little hard for me to identify, and I’m drinking water with this cigar.  Upon lighting, the cigar has a smooth taste, with mellow notes of sherry and oak, as one would expect, from a cigar with this name.  (Reminds me of the style used by Drew Estate to make their barrel aged cigars.)

The cigar has a beautiful draw, sending a plethora of almost sweet, white/gray smoke into the air.  That trademark ACC scent isn’t present on this cigar though, but that’s okay. The feel of the cigar in my fingers suggests plenty of tobacco in the blend and at first puff, one would think, would have a tight draw. But no, the draw is excellent as I mentioned earlier.

Medium bodied, but full flavored, the oak becomes soft vanilla notes across the palate.  If I searched hard enough, I tasted the lightness of sherry, making me wonder what style of sherry they used for the casks.

Solid cigar all the way through though.  And a great start to me getting into higher premium cigars!